Tuesday, March 3, 2015

CASAA officially launches its Board of Advisors

CASAA is pleased to announce the creation of its external Board of Advisors. Forming this esteemed group has been in the works for most of a year, but this represents its official launch. Most members of this group have been in communication with the CASAA leadership for a while, exchanging information and advice, though some of them have only been recently recruited to lend their advice to CASAA. In both cases, we are delighted to have this opportunity to work with them.

The group consists of Clive Bates, Dr. Brian Carter, Gregory Conley, Frank “Cisco” Correia, Fr. Jack Kearney, Oliver Kershaw, Dr. Riccardo Polosa, Louise Ross, Dr. Sally Satel, and Victoria Vasconcellos. Brief bios for each of them appear below. They bring a broad range of scientific expertise, political knowledge, communications expertise, and hands-on experience supporting consumer tobacco harm reduction choices and greatly expand CASAA’s networking opportunities.

Members of this group have agreed, to the extent that their many other projects allow, to be available for discussion and specific advice. They are encouraged to proactively offer advice (or criticism) about any CASAA action or policy. CASAA’s Chief Scientific Officer and Chief Operations Officer, Dr. Carl V Phillips, will serve as facilitator for the group.

CASAA Executive Director Julie Woessner observed, “This is an important step for CASAA. It increases our reach and available expertise, and demonstrates the broad-based support for our mission and organization from scientists, practitioners, and businesses who support tobacco harm reduction.”

___________________________________________________________

clive-247x300Clive Bates has had a diverse career in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors.  After securing a degree in Engineering from Cambridge University, he worked in IT marketing for IBM. In a switch of career he took a Masters in Environmental Technology and went on to work as an energy specialist in the environment movement, initially for Greenpeace. From 1997-2003 he was Director of Action on Smoking and Health (UK), campaigning to reduce the harms caused by smoking. In 2003 he joined Prime Minister Blair’s Strategy Unit as a civil servant and worked in senior roles in the public sector in the UK and for the United Nations in Sudan. At the start of 2013, he opened a new venture, Counterfactual, a consulting and advocacy practice focused on a pragmatic approach to sustainable development, energy policy and public health.

Carter Headshot ColorDr. Brian Carter earned a PhD in clinical psychology from Purdue University.  His principal field of study is addictive behaviors with a focus on the psychological and behavioral foundations of nicotine use, dependence, and motivation. As a faculty member in the Department of Behavioral Science at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1999 to 2010, he conducted multiple National Cancer Institute funded laboratory studies on the emotional, genetic, physiological, and behavioral aspects of nicotine use in cigarette smokers. His work has been extensively published in Addiction, Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Nicotine and Tobacco Research, and other scientific venues. With the growing popularity of e-cigarettes, he is now an independent consultant and scholar reviewing the scientific literature from a tobacco harm reduction perspective, including the potential public health benefits of smokeless tobacco and e-cigarette use.

conleyGregory Conley is the President of the American Vaping Association, a nonprofit organization that advocates for small- and medium-sized businesses in the vapor product market. In addition to his work with the AVA, Conley is an attorney and a consultant on e-cigarette legislative and regulatory issues. From 2014 to 2015, Conley served as a research fellow on nicotine and tobacco issues for the libertarian think tank the Heartland Institute. Conley’s introduction to the world of vaping came when he quit smoking with a vapor product while in law school in 2010.  From there, he served for approximately three years as the volunteer legislative director for CASAA.

ciscoFrancisco “Cisco” Correia is an experienced electronic cigarette vendor and innovator with extensive knowledge of the e-cigarette industry and its products. Mr. Correia owns Avid Vaper and has been a long-time advocate for electronic cigarettes.  He is well respected within the e-cigarette community and serves on the Board of Advisors as an industry expert.

kearneyFather Jack Kearney is Associate Pastor at St. Francis by the Sea and Good Shepherd churches. He was ordained a Roman Catholic deacon in 1980, and then delayed petitioning for ordination to the priesthood in order to attend training and certification at the Johnson Institute in Minnesota to serve families with members addicted to alcohol and other drugs. In 1986, he co-founded the Family Intervention Center and Services. He currently sits on two Los Angeles County Commissions: the Commission on Alcoholism, and the Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Commission. He is a Board Member and Past President of the California Association for Alcohol & Drug Educators (CAADE). He directs the Training Institute for Addiction Counselors (TIAC) and is an Instructor at Cypress College, Loyola Marymount University and California State University, Fullerton.

Oliver-Kershaw-01 needs croppingOliver Kershaw is the founder and managing director of E-Cigarette-Forum.Com. He started vaping in 2007, and set up the website to establish a global conversation about the then radical but under-performing (and under-discussed) technology. Oliver is saddened that the Oxford English Dictionary did not choose him as the originator of the word “vape”, but has made efforts to secure his legacy in other ways: by co-founding the E-Cigarette Summit at London’s Royal Society, by advocating in every which way he is able, by publishing his thoughts at his (co-founded) vaping.com website, and by vaping ostentatiously but considerately in public places. Oliver has a BSc in psychology and lives in London with his wife and two young children.

polosaDr. Riccardo Polosa is full professor of internal medicine and head of the Institute of Internal Emergency Medicine at the University of Catania. He is a specialist in respiratory diseases and clinical immunology, and founded and directs the Center for Tobacco Research at University of Catania, where he and colleagues conduct international clinical research. He is a scientific advisor for LIAF (the Italian anti-smoking league) and member of the Italian Institute of Health Technical committee on monitoring e-cigarettes. He was among the first scientific researchers to focus on e-cigarettes and, according to a 2014 review, is the author of the most academic articles on e-cigarettes. His multi-disciplinary research on the topic includes the first clinical trial on the safety and effectiveness of e-cigarettes in smokers.

louiseross-104x125Louise Ross is the Stop Smoking service manager for Leicester (England), working for the Leicestershire Partnership National Health Service Trust, one of the few stop smoking services that actively encourages tobacco harm reduction. She has conducted and presented research on its impressive success. She has worked in smoking cessation and tobacco control for ten years and is active on social media as “grannylouisa”. Previously she had managed a large care home for people with learning disabilities for almost 30 years.

Sally_SatelDr. Sally Satel is a resident scholar at American Enterprise Institute (AEI) and the staff psychiatrist at a local methadone clinic in D.C. Dr. Satel was an assistant professor of psychiatry at Yale University from 1988 to 1993 and remains a lecturer at Yale. She is an expert in addiction. She is interested in the intersection of medicine and culture and her research focuses on political trends in medicine and science and advocacy research. From 1993 to 1994 she was a Robert Wood Johnson policy fellow with the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee. She has written widely in academic journals on topics in psychiatry and medicine, and has published articles on cultural aspects of medicine and science in numerous magazines and journals. She has testified before Congress on veterans’ issues, mental health policy, drug courts,and health disparities. Dr. Satel is author of Drug Treatment: The Case for Coercion (AEI Press, 1999), and PC, M.D.: How Political Correctness Is Corrupting Medicine (Basic Books, 2001). She is coauthor of One Nation under Therapy (St. Martin’s Press, 2005), co-author of The Health Disparity Myth (AEI Press, 2006), and editor of When Altruism Isn’t Enough: The Case for Compensating Kidney Donors (AEI Press, 2009). Her recent book, co-authored with Emory psychologist Scott Lilienfeld is Brainwashed: The Seductive Appeal of Mindless Neuroscience (Basic, 2013). Brainwashed was a finalist for the 2013 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Science.

vickyVictoria Vasconcellos is a former long time smoker and the owner of Cignot Inc., established in 2009. Victoria has made it her mission to insure that smokers receive support and affordable access to what she considers a life changing option to smoking. She has personally assisted tens of thousands of smokers as they navigate the path to no longer smoking and is a founding member of the Illinois chapter of SFATA.



(Please note that members of the Board of Advisors are not directly involved with CASAA policy-making and activities, and thus CASAA actions may or may not reflect their opinions. Similarly, the opinions, statements, and actions of the advisors do not represent CASAA policy. Advisor affiliations are indicated for identification and as credentials, and do not imply any relationship between CASAA and the advisors’ organizations.)


CASAA Podcast Update March 2, 2015

CASAA Podcast Update March 2, 2015:

CASAA's Jan Johnson and Alex Clark discuss legislative- and advocacy-related matters of current interest to CASAA members and THR (tobacco harm reduction) advocates.



0:40 – CASAA is working on a system to streamline local alerts and broadcast local information.

2:20 – CASAA blog post about how we handle Calls to Action.

4:00 – Illinois Call to Action should be released within a week. In addition to HB 2404 and HB 3362, Illinois is likely looking at a tax bill.

4:20 – Florida Call to Action is expected to be issued for HB 827, which would treat e-cigarette devices as drug paraphernalia.

6:50 – A friendly shout out to VCC Tampa and Kevin Skipper for putting advocacy in the spotlight. Alex Clark and Julie Woessner attended the event, and they presented at the industry advocacy summit on Friday night. A video of the summit will be available in the coming weeks.

7:20 – Discussion about the role of lobbyists and how CASAA handles its Calls to Action and advocacy on behalf of consumers in a state.


As always:

Submit your testimonial for the CASAA Testimonials Project and Join CASAA so that you receive the most up-to-date information on issues affecting you.

Local Alert - Naperville, IL - Proposed bill would prohibit vaping where smoking is currently banned (1st Read) - City Council Hearing 03/03/15

Naperville City Council will meet TUESDAY 3/3/15 at 7:00PM (CST) in Council Chambers, Naperville Municipal Center, 400 S. Eagle St. and hear a first reading of an ordinance that would alter the definition of tobacco products to include “alternative nicotine products.”  By making this change, Naperville would be adding the use of e-cigarettes to their existing indoor smoking law which would prohibit use in hundreds of businesses and workplaces.  This bill would also require vapor retailers to obtain a “tobacco dealer’s license.”

Please take action now by sending emails and making phone calls to members of the city council and the mayor of Naperville.  Please see talking points below.

Naperville, IL - City Council
Mayor A. George Pradel
mayor@naperville.il.us
(630) 420-6018
Judy Brodhead
brodheadj@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5335
Steve Chirico
chiricos@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5336
Robert W. Fieseler
fieselerr@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5333
Paul Hinterlong
hinterlongp@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5362
Douglas Krause
kraused@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5332
Joseph J. McElroy
mcelroyj@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5334
Tom Miers
mierst@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5331
David G. Wentz
wentzd@naperville.il.us
(630) 305-5318

Comma delimited email list:
mayor@naperville.il.us, brodheadj@naperville.il.us, chiricos@naperville.il.us, fieselerr@naperville.il.us, hinterlongp@naperville.il.us, kraused@naperville.il.us, mcelroyj@naperville.il.us, mierst@naperville.il.us, wentzd@naperville.il.us

_________________________

SUGGESTED TALKING POINTS

  1. You are a resident and you oppose banning e-cigarette use where smoking is prohibited. (If you are responding to a Call to Action or Local Alert for a city or state in which you are not a resident, please mention any connection you have to the area, for example, you travel there on vacation or have friends/family in the area.)

  1. Tell your story on how switching to an e-cigarette has changed your life. (Avoid using slang terms such as "juice.")

  1. Clarify that:
    1. Smoking bans are ostensibly enacted to protect the public from the harm of secondhand smoke, but e-cigarettes have not been found to pose a risk to bystanders. In fact, all evidence to date shows that the low health risks associated with e-cigarettes are comparable to other smokeless nicotine products.
    2. The low risks of e-cigarettes is supported by research done by Dr. Siegel of Boston University, Dr. Eissenberg of Virginia Commonwealth, Dr Maciej L Goniewicz of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Dr. Laugesen of Health New Zealand, Dr. Igor Burstyn of Drexel University, and by the fact that the FDA testing, in spite of its press statement, failed to find harmful levels of carcinogens or toxic levels of any chemical in the vapor.
    3. A comprehensive review conducted by Dr. Igor Burstyn of Drexel University School of Public Health based on over 9,000 observations of e-cigarette liquid and vapor found "no apparent concern" for bystanders exposed to e-cigarette vapor, even under "worst case" assumptions about exposure.
    4. Electronic cigarette use is easy to distinguish from actual smoking. Although some e-cigarettes resemble real cigarettes, many do not. It is easy to tell when someone lights a cigarette from the smell of smoke. E-cigarette vapor is often practically odorless, and generally any detectable odor is not unpleasant and smells nothing like smoke. Additionally, e-cigarette users can decide whether to release any vapor ("discreet vaping").  With so little evidence of use, enforcing use bans on electronic cigarettes would be nearly impossible.
    5. The ability to use electronic cigarettes in public spaces will actually improve public health by inspiring other smokers to switch and reduce their health risks by an estimated 99%.
    6. Losing the ability to test e-liquids before purchasing will have a significant and negative impact on your ability to purchase/sell e-liquids.
    7. Many smokers first try e-cigarettes because they can use them where they cannot smoke, however, they often become "accidental quitters." This is a documented phenomenon unique to e-cigarettes. It may take a few months or only a few days, but they inevitably stop smoking conventional cigarettes. This is why including e-cigarettes in smoking bans could have serious unintended consequences!
    8. By making e-cigarette users go outdoors, the City will also be sending a strong message to traditional smokers that e-cigarettes are no safer than smoking. This will actually maintain the number of smokers, rather than help reduce smoking. This is a far more realistic risk to public health than any unfounded concerns about possible youth or non-smoker use uptake. In fact, the most recent report by the CDC showed that the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use over that past 3 years has not led to an increase in youth smoking. Youth smoking of traditional cigarttes continues to decline to record low levels.
    9. The children of smoking parents are far more likely to become smokers than the children of non-smoking parents who see smoking behaviors in public. The children of smoking parents who quit aren't any more likely to smoke than those of non-smoking parents. Prohibiting vapor products in public does little to protect the children of non-smoking parents from becoming smokers, but significantly increases the likelihood that many smoking parents won't switch to e-cigarettes. This only serves to keep the highest-risk children at risk.
    10. E-cigarette use does not promote the smoking of traditional cigarettes, nor does it threaten the gains of tobacco control over the past few decades. In fact, by normalizing e-cigarette use over traditional smoking, the efforts of tobacco control are being supported. If anything, e-cigarette use denormalizes conventional smoking by setting the example of smokers choosing a far less harmful alternative to traditional smoking. The CDC surveys clearly show that there has been no "gateway effect" causing non-smokers to start smoking. As e-cigarettes have become more popular, all available evidence is showing that more and more smokers are quitting traditional cigarettes, including youth smokers.
    11. Important Note: A typical and frequent lawmaker response to e-cigarette users who object to public use bans is "We aren't banning all use or sales, just use where smoking is also prohibited." Don't give them the opportunity to counter you in that way! Make it very clear that you understand that this is not a ban of e-cigarette sales or a ban of e-cigarette use where smoking is allowed, but that what IS proposed is still a step backward in public health, not a step forward.

4) Direct them to the CASAA.org website, as well as the CASAA Research Library, for more information.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Local Alert - St. Charles, MO - Bill 11543 would redefine "smoking" to include vaping. City Council Hearing TUESDAY, 03/03/15

Bill 11543 will be introduced in the St. Charles, MO City Council TUESDAY, March 3rd, 2015 at 7:00PM (CST).  This bill would expand the city’s definition of “smoking” to include the use of electronic cigarettes.  By deceptively equating vaping with smoking, this bill would require businesses that might allow vaping but prohibit smoking to now ban the use of both products.

St. Charles Residents should plan to attend this hearing even if testimony is not heard.  Residents should also email council members to express opposition to this bill (see talking points below).

It should be suggested to council members that business owners who wish to prohibit vaping in their establishments should have the option of posting a separate sign rather than being forced to confuse smoking with vaping.

St. Charles, MO - City Council
Vice President
Ward 1
Mary Ann Ohms
maryann.ohms@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-724-7422

Ward 2
Tom Besselman
tom.besselman@stcharlescitymo.gov
314-406-4844

Ward 3
Laurie Feldman
Laura.Feldman@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-946-4749
(Sponsor)
Ward 4
Mary West
mary.west@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-925-3877

Ward 5
John Hanneke
john.hanneke@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-949-5208

Ward 6
Jerry Reese
jerry.reese@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-949-0100
President (Sponsor)
Ward 7
Dave Beckering
david.beckering@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-949-2027

Ward 8
Rod Herrmann
rod.herrmann@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-946-9670

Ward 9
Ron Stivison
Ronald.stivison@stcharlescitymo.gov
636-946-4030

Ward 10
Bridget Ohmes
bridget.ohmes@stcharlescitymo.gov
--

Comma delimited email list:
maryann.ohms@stcharlescitymo.gov, tom.besselman@stcharlescitymo.gov, Laura.Feldman@stcharlescitymo.gov, mary.west@stcharlescitymo.gov, john.hanneke@stcharlescitymo.gov, jerry.reese@stcharlescitymo.gov, david.beckering@stcharlescitymo.gov, rod.herrmann@stcharlescitymo.gov, Ronald.stivison@stcharlescitymo.gov, bridget.ohmes@stcharlescitymo.gov

Please forward this email to anyone you know that lives or works in St. Charles.

Please connect with Bistate Regional Advocates for Vaping Education for more updates.

Thank You,
_____________________

SUGGESTED TALKING POINTS

  1. You are a resident and you oppose banning e-cigarette use where smoking is prohibited. (If you are responding to a Call to Action or Local Alert for a city or state in which you are not a resident, please mention any connection you have to the area, for example, you travel there on vacation or have friends/family in the area.)

  1. Tell your story on how switching to an e-cigarette has changed your life. (Avoid using slang terms such as "juice.")

  1. Clarify that:
    1. Smoking bans are ostensibly enacted to protect the public from the harm of secondhand smoke, but e-cigarettes have not been found to pose a risk to bystanders. In fact, all evidence to date shows that the low health risks associated with e-cigarettes are comparable to other smokeless nicotine products.
    2. The low risks of e-cigarettes is supported by research done by Dr. Siegel of Boston University, Dr. Eissenberg of Virginia Commonwealth, Dr Maciej L Goniewicz of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Dr. Laugesen of Health New Zealand, Dr. Igor Burstyn of Drexel University, and by the fact that the FDA testing, in spite of its press statement, failed to find harmful levels of carcinogens or toxic levels of any chemical in the vapor.
    3. A comprehensive review conducted by Dr. Igor Burstyn of Drexel University School of Public Health based on over 9,000 observations of e-cigarette liquid and vapor found "no apparent concern" for bystanders exposed to e-cigarette vapor, even under "worst case" assumptions about exposure.
    4. Electronic cigarette use is easy to distinguish from actual smoking. Although some e-cigarettes resemble real cigarettes, many do not. It is easy to tell when someone lights a cigarette from the smell of smoke. E-cigarette vapor is often practically odorless, and generally any detectable odor is not unpleasant and smells nothing like smoke. Additionally, e-cigarette users can decide whether to release any vapor ("discreet vaping").  With so little evidence of use, enforcing use bans on electronic cigarettes would be nearly impossible.
    5. The ability to use electronic cigarettes in public spaces will actually improve public health by inspiring other smokers to switch and reduce their health risks by an estimated 99%.
    6. Losing the ability to test e-liquids before purchasing will have a significant and negative impact on your ability to purchase/sell e-liquids.
    7. Many smokers first try e-cigarettes because they can use them where they cannot smoke, however, they often become "accidental quitters." This is a documented phenomenon unique to e-cigarettes. It may take a few months or only a few days, but they inevitably stop smoking conventional cigarettes. This is why including e-cigarettes in smoking bans could have serious unintended consequences!
    8. By making e-cigarette users go outdoors, the City will also be sending a strong message to traditional smokers that e-cigarettes are no safer than smoking. This will actually maintain the number of smokers, rather than help reduce smoking. This is a far more realistic risk to public health than any unfounded concerns about possible youth or non-smoker use uptake. In fact, the most recent report by the CDC showed that the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use over that past 3 years has not led to an increase in youth smoking. Youth smoking of traditional cigarttes continues to decline to record low levels.
    9. The children of smoking parents are far more likely to become smokers than the children of non-smoking parents who see smoking behaviors in public. The children of smoking parents who quit aren't any more likely to smoke than those of non-smoking parents. Prohibiting vapor products in public does little to protect the children of non-smoking parents from becoming smokers, but significantly increases the likelihood that many smoking parents won't switch to e-cigarettes. This only serves to keep the highest-risk children at risk.
    10. E-cigarette use does not promote the smoking of traditional cigarettes, nor does it threaten the gains of tobacco control over the past few decades. In fact, by normalizing e-cigarette use over traditional smoking, the efforts of tobacco control are being supported. If anything, e-cigarette use denormalizes conventional smoking by setting the example of smokers choosing a far less harmful alternative to traditional smoking. The CDC surveys clearly show that there has been no "gateway effect" causing non-smokers to start smoking. As e-cigarettes have become more popular, all available evidence is showing that more and more smokers are quitting traditional cigarettes, including youth smokers.
    11. Important Note: A typical and frequent lawmaker response to e-cigarette users who object to public use bans is "We aren't banning all use or sales, just use where smoking is also prohibited." Don't give them the opportunity to counter you in that way! Make it very clear that you understand that this is not a ban of e-cigarette sales or a ban of e-cigarette use where smoking is allowed, but that what IS proposed is still a step backward in public health, not a step forward.

4) Direct them to the CASAA.org website, as well as the CASAA Research Library, for more information.